18.2.14

Second home...

source | I like this quote, it represents so many people I know who are so optimistic in the face of overwhelming adversity and they are the most optimistic people even though life is telling them otherwise, and I do believe that 'Optimism is the foundation of courage'
So blogland, I was once again at A&E last night. It's starting to get really old and I reckon you guys are probably bored about reading about my latest venture into that place. I haven't been feeling very well the past week or so, or more so than I normally feel and then on Saturday when I was changing my dressing over my line I noticed that there was a fair bit of green puss coming from the exit of the line (yes I know To Much Info) and it was red and sore too. Now we all know that since I had my infection last year I've been somewhat paranoid in regards to my line and infections but I decided on Saturday that since I didn't have a temperature that it probably wasn't a infection and that I would just keep a really close eye on it. Then yesterday I wasn't feeling very well at all, just really off and then I changed my dressing again once again there was a fair bit of puss around the line and it looked a bit more red than it had on Saturday. I took a photo of it both Saturday and yesterday and showed my mum and sister so they could say whether they thought it looked worse because I know I can be a bit paranoid in regards to my line but Candice said she thought it did and also because I thought it was more sore we decided to get it checked out.

I officially hate the receptionists at A&E or more specifically one of the receptionists. She is the rudest receptionist I have ever had to deal with. In my notes it specifically says that if I come to A&E with something wrong with my line I am not to wait to be seen, I told her this and she told me that, that didn't matter they were really busy and I would have to wait to be triaged by a nurse like everyone else. Now at this point my chest was hurting, I wasn't feeling very well, there were no seats to sit on and I just generally felt like crap. My mum and sister managed to get me seen by the nurse pretty quickly. Because I didn't have a fever and the only sort of signs of an infection was the exit point of my line and raised pulse she said we would have to wait a little while because the A&E actually had queuing ambulances and the hospital was pretty much full. I was okay with that, there's not much you can do about that, if there's no beds there's no beds if you know what I mean. Although I do think they could improve how they do things because they knew they would have to take bloods from me I don't really understand why they couldn't take bloods from me when they triaged me and then by the time there was a bed the blood would have been ready.

Anyway so my mum and I waited about 2 hours and I started to feel really dodgy like really dizzy and faint and all I was doing was sitting down so my mum told the receptionist and then a nurse called me through to  a bed. I luckily had a nurse who I've had before and who knew most of my stuff and we joked about how my line was a bit of hassle :D. While I was in the actual A&E bit we did bloods, blood cultures, heart trace, all the usual stuff and another X-ray. I started to feel really off while I was in there though and may have thrown up on my nurse, whoops.

I was moved up to a ward where we had to wait for a doctor to go over my results and then they would decide what to do. While we waited I threw up again which was fun lol. The staff on the ward were super lovely and the doctor who was dealing with me even did a bit of research about my line and what was wrong with me before he saw me. That's something I always appreciate when I'm being dealt with by a doctor I have never met before, it makes me feel less anxious. He said that my x-ray and bloods showed no sign of infection in my line because my CRP, blood cell count and all that were normal but I have a infection around the exit site of my line which is common when you have a line coming out of you. So they've given me some antibiotics to get rid of it and I just have to be extra efficient when cleaning my line and changing my dressing. We're putting the fact that I was sick down to the fact that  I have been producing a lot of phlegm because of my cold and it's just my bodies way of getting it out of my system  plus the fact that it was horrid and muggy in the hospital wasn't making me feel much better lol. We got home about 2:30am so I'm tired today but at least I know I haven't got a infection in my line and hopefully this cold will be on it's way out soon.

I honestly hope that's it for a while, I can't be dealing with this going into A&E every few weeks thing. I mean I like to be on a first name basis with my normal doctors but you know you go to A&E too much when you start to be on a first name basis with them.        
    
 Chat soon guys 
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4 comments:

  1. I've had some major issues with A&E receptionists in the past - I've never had big health problems like you have, but have had a combination of a few things over the years! I had gallstones for a number of years, not knowing what they were until about 2 years ago when I had my gallbladder removed, but prior to finding out, I had several attacks, with one reaching really severe pain so an emergency doctor sent me off to A&E (thinking it was a ruptured appendix) where they would apparently have me already admitted, with a bed prepared and ready to go into surgery after a quick check over. I arrived at A&E to find that they had this info, put a wrist band on me and told me to wait for 5 mins while they prepared the bed. 5 hours later the pain had subsided a little (as gallstones tend to do), but I'd sat in a waiting room that was hugely overpacked while drunk students were sent to the beds by the receptionists. They weren't bothered about the amount of pain I was in, I didn't even get to see a nurse or doctor and was offered no medication or even water to drink (which I found out later would have helped the pain). When I later found out what the problem was and had to have my gallbladder removed with some urgency as the stones were large enough to be dangerously blocking the ducts, they told me that the subsiding in the pain could have quite easily been my gallbladder rupturing and should have been rushed straight into surgery then - it was just lucky it hadn't happened!
    Anyway, sorry for ranting here, just wanted to add my part to your discussion - I definitely think there
    Hope you start to feel better from the cold and infection soon though :)

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    1. Omg, that sounds awful Sian! I can't imagine being sat in that much pain in a A&E waiting room for 5 hours, that really must have have been horrid. I think my mum is writing a complaint letter about the receptionist because every time we have been there she has been awful and I can understand people having a off day but it's literally every time we've been there.

      I hope you're okay now though?! xoxo

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  2. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you that you won't have to go back to A&E anytime soon.
    Beth x

    http://www.thebritishgirl.co.uk/

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    1. Awww thank-you Bethan, I hope so too. I hoping my next venture into hospital (besides bloods tests) will be my transplant, fingers crossed anyway lol.

      xoxo

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Thank-you for commenting <3